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Neurological Illnesses - Parkinson’s Disease

Robert Buchanan MD

Robert Buchanan, MD, a board certified psychiatrist and neurosurgeon, cares for people with Parkinson’s disease and other problems through Seton Brain & Spine Institute of Austin, Texas. Before establishing himself in medicine, Dr. Robert Buchanan earned his MD with honors and distinction at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

An illness that interrupts normal patterns of movement in patients, Parkinson’s Disease causes tremors, balance problems, stiffness, and postural instability. The disease is progressive, meaning that symptoms often start mild and get gradually worse over time. The illness originates in the brain, where the cells responsible for secreting dopamine begin to die. The condition is most common in those aged 60 or older.

Researchers have yet to discover therapies that can cure Parkinson’s. However, they have made great strides in developing treatments to manage it. For instance, combinations of drugs like levodopa and carbidopa have been shown to help the brain produce dopamine, improving symptoms in about 75 percent of patients. In the event that medications fail, surgeries like deep brain stimulation have been approved by the FDA for treating Parkinson’s.

Robert Buchanan, MD, a board certified psychiatrist and neurosurgeon, cares for people with Parkinson’s disease and other problems through Seton Brain & Spine Institute of Austin, Texas. Before establishing himself in medicine, Dr. Robert Buchanan earned his MD with honors and distinction at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

An illness that interrupts normal patterns of movement in patients, Parkinson’s Disease causes tremors, balance problems, stiffness, and postural instability. The disease is progressive, meaning that symptoms often start mild and get gradually worse over time. The illness originates in the brain, where the cells responsible for secreting dopamine begin to die. The condition is most common in those aged 60 or older.
Researchers have yet to discover therapies that can cure Parkinson’s. However, they have made great strides in developing treatments to manage it. For instance, combinations of drugs like levodopa and carbidopa have been shown to help the brain produce dopamine, improving symptoms in about 75 percent of patients. In the event that medications fail, surgeries like deep brain stimulation have been approved by the FDA for treating Parkinson’s.

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